Ban Hammer Dropped in the National PUBG League

Four players slammed with three-year bans from National PUBG League for cheating


An investigation conducted by the PUBG esports team found that Christian “Cuhris” Narvaez, Liam “Liammm” Tran, Tyler “DevowR” Sti, and Mark “Tefl0n” Formaro qualified for the NPL preseason using “unauthorized programs” in the game. The four players were given “permanent in-game bans” during a massive wave of bans on players, even professionals that used cheats, in December 19 last year. The four were also accused of using third-party software to cheat in public matches and during the NPL online qualifiers.

The teams of those four players — namely Reapers, Totality, Death Row, and Almost — have also been disqualified from the NPL.

Their spots in the NPL will be taken by the next four teams in the overall NPL online qualifiers.

The PUBG esports team added that the four players have also been issued a three-year ban from participating in any official PUBG esports events.

“In the future, players found to have been banned in-game due to the use of unauthorized programs during professional esports competitions will be banned from competitive play for a minimum of three years to a maximum of a lifetime starting on the date of completion of an official league investigation,” said the PUBG esports team in a statement posted on Twitter.

They continued that, in case an incident similar to this one should happen again, “a global penalty system will be released at a later date.”

The NPL preseason is currently ongoing and will continue until January 13. The top 16 teams from the preseason qualifiers will enter the first official phase of the NPL, which is set to begin between late January and early March 2019. The NPL will feature five weeks of play and will be broadcast from the OGN Super Arena in Manhattan Beach, California.

Source: Fox Sports Asia – https://www.foxsportsasia.com/esports/pubg/1009459/pubg-four-players-slammed-with-three-year-bans-from-national-pubg-league-for-cheating/

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